Cuba rejects U.S. accusations of military support for Venezuela

Cuba “categorically” rejected on Friday the “repeated and false” accusations made by U.S. Vice President Mike Pence and other U.S. officials regarding the presence of Cuban military personnel in Venezuela.

“I categorically reject repeated and false accusations by Vice President Pence and other U.S. officials about Cuban military men who ‘train’, ‘control’ or ‘intimidate’ in Venezuela,” Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez wrote in his Twitter account.

The U.S. Vice President said that “Cuban intelligence and military continue to train, support and equip Venezuela’s secret police to “harass protesters and silence the opposition” in an article published in the Nuevo Herald newspaper in Miami.

In response to Pence’s accusations, the head of Cuban diplomacy replied that they are “gross lies” and attributed them to “the ferocious macartista propaganda campaign deployed by the United States” against Venezuela.

Cuba has repeatedly ratified its unconditional support for the government of President Nicolas Maduro and has accused the United States of unleashing an “unconventional” war against it.

“Cuba and Venezuela maintain a relationship of mutual respect and true solidarity. Without intervention in internal affairs and without political subordination. #NicolasMaduro and the civic-military union of the Bolivarian and Chavista people,” emphasized the head of Cuban diplomacy.

Last month, the Cuban executive, presided over by Miguel Diaz-Canel, described as “infamous” another accusation by Washington that Cuba maintains a private army in Venezuela and urged the U.S. to present evidence in this regard.

Since the current political crisis in Venezuela began on January 23 with the proclamation of the leader of the Venezuelan Parliament, Juan Guaidó, as president in charge, Cuba has repeatedly ratified its unconditional support for the government of President Nicolás Maduro and has accused the United States of unleashing an “unconventional” war against it.

The Havana executive has also considered that the real objective behind the crisis in Venezuela and the U.S. recognition of Juan Guaidó as interim president of that country is the control of the “vast resources” of the oil power.

Cuba and Venezuela have been close allies since 2000, when then Presidents Hugo Chávez and Fidel Castro – both deceased – signed the so-called Integral Cooperation Agreement by which the South American country began to provide the island with oil at subsidized prices in exchange for professional services.

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